Servant Leadership: Dice

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After my recent post on the great things being done by people in our space, I decided this is too important of a topic to not continue.  And my promise to you is I won’t ever pimp out a company that I do any business with unless I tell you.  I’m keeping an eye out for great stories on servant leadership in the HR tech space.  Feel free to send me any stories you have on the topic!

I am partial to good people doing good work.  Over the last couple of years, I’ve had the pleasure of working with the team over at Dice and see how they are working to both support and innovate in our space.  This seems like a good time to share a couple of those stories.

First, the work Dice is doing in the HR space is pretty great.  I love Open Web (and I’m not a recruiter, which means mostly I just admire it from afar).  I like any tool that makes life easier, and a system that pulls together data from so many sources to create a full picture of the candidate is just that.  In some of my conference sessions, I reference my favorite Jay Kuhns quote, “We used to recruit like Abe Lincoln did.  We put an add in the Gettysburg Post and hoped someone read it.”  Open Web gets recruiters off of that mindset by giving them a much better look at where to spend their time.  While there is sometimes the belief that job sites are invested in pushing as many links to the page as they can, the Dice team has moved to make it easier to spend time on the high quality candidates to get the best fit.  And I dig that.

More than that, though, I am eternally grateful for the wonderful partner Dice has been in our space.  They have invested a lot of time and effort into supporting the social media space, including sponsorship at big conferences (like SHRM annual) and smaller, more focused events (like TalentNet).  Both segments are important to our space, and the Dice team not only contributes their dollars in support, they show up and work to make the events better.

Personally, I’m also in their debt for their support of our annual No Kid Hungry event, helping us raise thousands of dollars for a great cause.  I know that when it comes time to start planning, anything we can dream up will get the support of Terry Starr and her team, MaryLou Garcia and Cathy Erickson.  They’ve been wonderful partners, and have used their resources to make the world a better place in a way that has very little to do with their services.

I can hear the cynics out there.  Yes, yes, of course they benefit from it, in brand exposure if nothing else.  But there are a ton of companies in our space who do nothing of the sort.  We should be spending our time celebrating those that choose to do, that choose to contribute, that choose to help.  Doing nothing is easy.  Being an innovative company that changes the space and works to support our varied passions?  That’s pretty rare.

Thanks Terry, MaryLou and Cathy.  I can’t tell you and the team how much you are appreciated.

Vendors and Education – Servant Leadership

I wrote a post a while back talking about the infuriating trend of vendors who speak at events and do nothing but sell. It gives others a bad name, and leaves the audience with a bad taste in their collective mouth. It’s not ok, and I maintain that if you ever see it happen, you are not only allowed but obligated to walk out. The tragedy is that there are many of us in the vendor space know our topics, know what matters, and have a lot to love for HR. And too often, that is forgotten.

So I wanted to take a moment to share a great example of people in the vendor space who not only know how to share their vast knowledge without making it a commercial, but who are making the HR space a stronger community in the process.

Anyone who has spent time around Eric Winegardner will know that he is not only brilliant, but he is of the most caring, giving people in our space. And he IS Monster to most of us. I’ve had the pleasure of watching him present several times and have always been blown away by the depth and breadth of his knowledge. I remember at an HRevolution event a couple of years ago talking to Dan Crosby about Eric. Dan’s comment was, “If you are presenting, and Eric is sitting your room, you better be ready because the conversation level is about to be ratcheted up several notches.” That’s the kind of game the man throws.  And that resonates throughout the team.

So it fills my heart with joy to see the Power Recruiter Workshops Monster is putting on right now. (Full disclosure: I do no business, spend no money, and receive nothing from Monster on a regular basis. Just so we’re clear.) Eric, Lisa Watson (who is divine in her own right) and their team are out on the road presenting six hours (SIX HOURS) of free, HRCI certified training for recruiters out in the trenches. It’s been several years since these were offered (the last round, I hear tell, were before Twitter was a thing). The content is designed to teach recruiters how to be, well, recruiters. (Don’t take that lightly. Too often recruiting as a job gets short shrift in the HR world. We like to think anyone can recruit, which is kind of true. But not just anyone can recruit in a way that changes the business.)

How much does the course cost, I can hear you asking. That would be zero dollars. Nothing down, nothing a month. How many new clients does Monster expect to sign at these events? I’m guessing also zero. This is them giving back to our community and making it stronger. It’s what we should ALL be doing, though most vendors in the space pass it over in search of the quarterly sales numbers. This kind of contribution is important, and we need more of it.

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I had the chance to drop in on the team, which included Alanna Lombardi, Karla Russell and Paul MacGillivray, in Boston as they were preparing for a session the next day. There was no marketing team getting everything ready. No army of minions making sure there were just the right number of bottles of water, bowls of M&Ms (no browns, of course) in strategically placed areas, no one making sure Eric, Lisa and their team were picked up in black s500 with the interior at exactly 71 degrees. The team were all in the room busting their humps to make sure the people who came the next day had a great experience and learned as much as possible.

You know what that’s called? Servant Leadership. And we need more of it.

I’m proud to know these people, and to think of them as friends. I’m even more proud to work in the same space and share their service with others. If you are in Chicago, New York, Atlanta, Los Angles or San Francisco, and have any interest at all in learning more about the recruiting space (or just in learning in general) check out the upcoming dates in those cities. (Sorry Dallas and Boston. Maybe next time.) More importantly, keep your eyes open for vendors in the space who do this kind of service to our profession and ask nothing in return. Those are the people we should appreciate and support. They are worth your time and attention. Give it up.

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